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Alaska Department of Fish and Game


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Alaska Fish and Game Tracking Projects

  • Hooper Bay Seal Tagging Project
    The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is working with the Ice Seal Committee and local hunters to capture and deploy satellite transmitters on ice seals to document their habitat use and movements. Such information is important to understand impacts and develop mitigation measures for activities such as oil and gas and shipping lanes.
  • Satellite Tracking of Western Arctic Bowhead Whales
    Bowhead whales are the most important species for subsistence communities along the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas. To better understand the whales’ movement, migration, feeding, and diving habits and how they might be affected by offshore and nearshore oil and gas activities, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission, and others began a cooperative research project in 2005 to study the western Arctic stock of bowhead whales.
  • Village-based Walrus Habitat Use Studies in the Chukchi Sea
    Working cooperatively with the Eskimo Walrus Commission and walrus hunters from local communities, ADF&G designed a study to deploy satellite transmitters and conduct counts and observations of walruses on haulouts near villages in spring and fall. From 4 June to 1 July 2013, ADF&G deployed 34 satellite-linked transmitters; 28 on females (13 of which had calves of the year) and 6 on males.

Other Satellite Telemetry Tracking Projects in Alaska

  • Tracking Polar Bears by Satellite
    The USGS Alaska Science Center uses the latest technology in satellite radio-tracking to fill key information gaps on how polar bears use both the sea ice and land. Adult female polar bears are captured, fitted with satellite telemetry collars, and followed throughout their annual range. In collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service we are also experimenting with glue-on and ear tag satellite transmitters, which can be deployed on adult male bears and younger, still-growing bears.
  • Tracking the Porcupine Caribou Herd
    This is a cooperative project between a number of wildlife agencies and Boards to use satellite radio-collars on Porcupine Caribou to document the seasonal range use and migration patterns of the herd. The herd's total home range is approximately 260,000 km2, between Kaktovik, Alaska to Aklavik, NWT to Dawson City, Yukon.
  • Tracking Bar-tailed Godwits
    The Alaska Science Center shorebird research project used satellite telemetry to follow the migrations of two populations of bar-tailed godwits, a group of 9 from New Zealand (NZ) and a group of 15 from Western Australia (WA). The birds from WA represent a subspecies that nests in eastern Siberia whereas the New Zealand birds nest in Alaska. The data is used to compare the migration strategies of the two populations.
  • Tracking King Eider Migration
    King Eiders are large sea ducks that nest in Arctic ecosystems around the world and migrate and winter at sea. Since 2002 the University of Alaska Fairbanks has tracked the migration and movements of King Eiders from breeding grounds in northern Alaska. This data set includes all the locations provided by satellite-tracked King Eiders between June 2002 and December 2008.

Hooper Bay Seal Tagging Project

Most Recent Map

Map tracking ice seal movements between 09/11/2012 – 10/27/2012
In June 2012 we deployed four satellite transmitters on ringed seals near Hooper Bay, Alaska. The longest minimum distance traveled by a seal was 2,455 miles (RS12-01-M), which last transmitted a signal north of 76 degrees latitude in the Beaufort Sea, northwest of Bank Island, on 8 August 2012. One transmitter (RS12-03-M) sent signals as late as 27 October 2012. No signals, however, were received between 11 September and 27 October; therefore we do not know the path this seal traveled from east of Wrangel Island, Russia to Port Clarence, south of Wales, Alaska (about 550 miles). The satellite tags (SPOT tags) attached to these ringed seals were fitted to their hind flippers and tend to return few locations when seals swim through open water for long periods of time.

Project Overview

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is working with the Ice Seal Committee and local hunters to capture and deploy satellite transmitters on ice seals to document their habitat use and movements. Such information is important to understand impacts and develop mitigation measures for activities such as oil and gas and shipping lanes.