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Current Rotenone Projects in Alaska

Soldotna Creek Restoration

Northern pike are not native to the Kenai Peninsula. They were illegally introduced to the Soldotna Creek Drainage in the 1970’s and have since resulted in the loss of salmon and trout fisheries, particularly in the western portion of the drainage (East and West Mackey Lakes and Derks Lake) where northern pike are now the only fish present. The Soldotna Creek Drainage encompasses 42 mi2 and drains into the Kenai River near river mile 22. Though the Kenai River, itself, is not ideal northern pike habitat, northern pike entering the river have the potential to colonize the Moose River which is. Of greatest concern is the significant production of Kenai coho salmon that rear in the Moose River. Northern pike establishment here could have a devastating impact on future coho salmon populations. To date, a self-sustaining population of northern pike has not been detected in the Kenai River drainage outside of the Soldotna Creek drainage. To prevent northern pike from expanding into the Moose River and to restore native fish populations within the Soldotna Creek drainage, ADF&G proposes to eradicate the invasive northern pike population through a multi-year eradication project. After careful evaluation of various control and eradication options, ADF&G believes treating the Soldotna Creek Drainage with rotenone systematically over a four-year period will provide a safe, cost efficient and permanent solution to eradicate the pike and allow for restoration of native fish assemblages.

ADF&G has written an environmental assessment for the restoration of the Soldotna Creek Drainage and is now soliciting public comments. Public comments will be accepted during the period of April 21, 2014 through May 20, 2014.

On August 27, 2014, the USFWS issued a Finding of no Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Soldotna Creek Restoration Project Environmental Assessment. The FONSI public review period will run from August 28 through September 12, 2014.

For questions contact:

  • Robert Massengill at 907-262-9368

Written comments can be either emailed to robert.massengill@alaska.gov, or mailed to: The Stormy Lake Restoration Project, Attention: Robert Massengill, ADF&G Sport Fish Division, 43961K-Beach Road, Suite B, Soldotna, AK 99669. To be accepted emails must be sent, or postal mailings postmarked, no later than May 15, 2014.